Mexican Workers Gain Right to Unionize, Negotiate Pay

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A Mexican woman sorts pinot noir wine grapes during the wine harvest, Santa Maria, CA, Oct 03, 2007; (Shutterstock.com).

On May 1, known around the world as May Day and International Workers’ Day, workers in Mexico finally gained the right to organize unions and negotiate their pay.

Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador signed a labor reform bill which grants workers the legal right to collective bargaining without fear of retaliation or harassment, Vox reported. Under the new labor law, contracts will require secret ballot union votes and workers’ consent.

“This is a huge advancement for Mexico’s workers,” López Obrador said during a press conference on April 30. “Before this reform, workers couldn’t vote freely, by secret ballot, to elect their union representatives. Now workers can choose.”

The new law allows workers to freely and legally participate in labor unions. It also dictates that workers cannot be forced…

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One comment

  • dsim002

    $4.15 for a day’s work?! Yeah, they gotta ask for more. That’s not right. Hardest working people and they get THAT MUCH?!

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